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AP English Language: Help and Review

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❶The argument itself may even seem scattered and all over the place. Lesson 1 - What Are Nouns?

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AP English Language Multiple Choice Tips
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How well you responded to the prompt: Did you completely and fully address all of the tasks presented in the prompt, without misunderstanding any of them? How convincing and well-supported your argument was: Do you take a clear position that is not overly basic, simplistic, or obvious? Can you comprehensively support your position with evidence? Is your evidence well-chosen and well-explained? Do you tie everything back to your main argument?

Have you thought through the implications of your stated position? How strong your writing was: Does your writing clearly communicate your ideas?

Are your sentences not just grammatically correct, but sophisticated? Do you have a consistent style and a strong vocabulary? Is your paper well-organized and logically arranged? Each rubric broadly assesses these three factors. However, each task is also different in nature, so the rubrics do have some differences. Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for the score of 8 and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their argument, thorough in development, or impressive in their control of language.

Essays earning a score of 8 effectively address the task in the prompt. They develop their argument by effectively synthesizing at least three of the sources. The evidence and explanations used are appropriate and convincing. The prose demonstrates a consistent ability to control a wide range of the elements of effective writing but is not necessarily flawless. You thoroughly responded to the prompt, successfully using and citing at least three of the sources to support your argument.

You supported your argument in a persuasive way. Your writing is competent, although there may be some minor errors. Essays earning a score of 7 meet the criteria for the score of 6 but provide more complete explanation, more thorough development, or a more mature prose style. Essays earning a score of 6 adequately address the task in the prompt. They develop their argument by adequately synthesizing at least three of the sources. The evidence and explanations used are appropriate and sufficient.

The language may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. You responded to the prompt in a reasonable way. You used and cited at least 3 of the sources in creating your argument. You supported your argument in a reasonably persuasive way, although not as compellingly as an 8 essay. Your writing is generally understandable.

Essays earning a score of 5 address the task in the prompt. They develop their argument by synthesizing at least three sources, but how they use and explain sources is somewhat uneven, inconsistent, or limited. You did respond to the prompt. You used and cited at least 3 of the sources in creating your argument, but you did not use all of them particularly effectively. The connection between the documents and your argument is underdeveloped.

Your writing is mostly understandable but may have errors. Essays earning a score of 4 inadequately address the task in the prompt. They develop their argument by synthesizing at least two sources, but the evidence or explanations used may be inappropriate, insufficient, or unconvincing.

You did not adequately respond to the prompt. You used and cited at least two sources, but you did not effectively link them to your argument. Your essay may summarize sources instead of truly taking a position, or you may have misread the sources. Your writing is not consistently clear. Essays earning a score of 3 meet the criteria for the score of 4 but demonstrate less success in addressing the task. They are less perceptive in their understanding of the sources, or their explanation or examples may be particularly limited or simplistic.

The essays may show less maturity in their control of writing. Your essay did not adequately respond to the prompt. Your interpretation of the sources is incorrect or your argument is overly simplistic. Your writing is overly basic or unclear.

Essays earning a score of demonstrate little success in addressing the task in the prompt. They may merely allude to knowledge gained from reading the sources rather than cite the sources themselves. These essays may misread the sources, fail to develop a position, or substitute a simpler task by merely summarizing or categorizing the sources or by merely responding to the prompt tangentially with unrelated, inaccurate, or inappropriate explanation.

Essays that score 2 often demonstrate consistent weaknesses in writing, such as grammatical problems, a lack of development or organization, or a lack of control. You barely addressed the prompt. You may not cite any sources directly, misunderstand the sources, never take a position, or write things that are not relevant to the prompt.

Writing is very weak, including grammatical issues. Essays earning a score of 1 meet the criteria for the score of 2 but are undeveloped, especially simplistic in their explanation, weak in their control of writing, or do not allude to or cite even one source. Your writing barely addressed the prompt. Explanations are extremely simple, writing is incredibly weak, or sources are not used or cited at all. Indicates an off-topic response, one that merely repeats the prompt, an entirely crossed-out response, a drawing, or a response in a language other than English.

Essays earning a score of 9 meet the criteria for the score of 8 and, in addition, are especially sophisticated in their argument, thorough in their development, or impressive in their control of language.

You achieved everything an 8 essay did, but the quality of either your argument or your writing is exceptional. They develop their analysis with evidence and explanations that are appropriate and convincing, referring to the passage explicitly or implicitly.

You successfully and persuasively analyzed the rhetoric of the excerpt in a way that is strongly supported by specific examples in the text.

Your writing is versatile and strong. You achieved everything a 6 essay did, but your argument was either better explained or supported or your writing was of a higher caliber. They develop their analysis with evidence and explanations that are appropriate and sufficient, referring to the passage explicitly or implicitly.

The essay may contain lapses in diction or syntax, but generally the prose is clear. You successfully analyzed the rhetoric of the excerpt, using appropriate references to the text. Your writing was generally understandable. The evidence or explanations used may be uneven, inconsistent, or limited. You analyzed the rhetoric of the excerpt, although evidence from the passage may have been poorly used or deployed. These essays may misunderstand the passage, misrepresent the strategies the author uses, or may analyze these strategies insufficiently.

The evidence or explanations used may be inappropriate, insufficient, or unconvincing. You did not analyze the rhetoric in the passage in a reasonable way. Textual evidence may not be appropriate to the task at hand.

The essays may show less maturity in control of writing. The writing may also be even more inconsistent or basic. These essays may misunderstand the prompt, misread the passage, fail to analyze the strategies used, or substitute a simpler task by responding to the prompt tangentially with unrelated, inaccurate, or inappropriate explanation.

The essays often demonstrate consistent weaknesses in writing, such as grammatical problems, a lack of development or organization, or a lack of control.

Exam Questions and Scoring Information For free-response questions from prior exams, along with scoring information, check out the tables below.

The third sample response has been replaced with the appropriate text EE. Secure Exams for Classroom Use Includes sample student responses and scoring commentary. Available on the AP Course Audit site. Log in to your account and then click on the Secure Documents link within the Resources section of your Course Status page. Online Score Reports Access your score reports. Late-Testing Policies Review the late-testing policy and fees.

This is what you add to it, including arguments and supporting evidence. If you write your essay with choppy, short sentences having a simple vocabulary, the reader is going to assume that you are not well-versed in the English language.

This can severely hurt your score—especially considering you are taking an exam in AP Language and Composition. If anything, this course should make your writing shine and appeal to the scorer. Although you want to keep all of these tips in mind, remember that this is still a timed portion of the exam. Develop Time Management Skills: Learning time management skills early on can help tremendously when it comes to timed exams.

Practice taking timed exams frequently throughout the semester to build confidence and skill. Knowing the rubric is an incredibly strategic move in acing the AP Language and Composition essay portion. When you know what exactly it is the scorers usually look for, you can be at ease. This is because you know exactly what to put into your arguments to make for a high-scoring essay. Develop a Good Attitude: Having a good attitude going into the course will show the teacher that you are there to learn.

Teachers are more willing to help students that seem upbeat and overall well-rounded. This can also translate into confidence when it comes exam time. Reading a few books for leisure in between assignments will help drastically in developing a writing style of your own as well. However, it is a good idea to practice dissecting everything you read. When reading, ask yourself: Who is the audience in this piece? What is it that the author is trying to accomplish by writing this?

What is the main idea? Is there any symbolism used in vague sentences? They are very busy people with thousands of essays to grade. They do not have much time trying to decipher your chicken scratch. The more the scorers can read, the more there is to grade. Plan Out Your Essays: Even though the essay portion is timed, you should still take a few minutes to plan out your arguments. The last thing you want to do is confuse your readers by having a sloppy essay with little to no organization or planning.

Plans help bring structure and life to your writings. But mostly, it just bores the reader. When writing your essays for the AP Language and Composition exam, be specific. The prompt may ask you to discuss the rhetoric devices used in a passage. Instead of just listing them, provide a brief description of each device and how it is used.

This will display a sophisticated understanding of the material sure to impress the readers. This goes hand in hand with number five. A healthy body leads to a healthy mind; they go hand in hand.

Be sure to fuel your body and brain with water and a good hearty breakfast before your exam. Moreover, be sure to get enough exercise and eat healthy throughout the rest of the year. Learn How to Handle Stress: Stress can take a toll on each and every one of us. Learning how to handle it is a skill that is vital to every aspect of life, especially when it comes to school.

Be sure to remember that your mental and physical health is more important than a score on a high school exam. Know your limits and take breaks when needed so you can assure a happy and healthy brain. Be comfortable in uncertainty, for that will lead to clarity. The essence of all art, and literature is no exception, is that it dwells in the realm of ambiguity and multiplicity; this is what makes great art.

If students can only manage or see one answer, they will never be able to truly understand literature and will always succumb to superficial interpretations and debilitating stress. Thanks for the truly insightful tip from Dan B. Say you have to read two articles, one in the San Francisco Chronicle and one posted on a blog.

You know nothing about either author. You know nothing about the content topic. Brainstorm about what credibility factors you can deduce before you even see the articles. Thanks for the tip from Mark M. Multiple choice always presents a combination of easy, medium, and hard questions for each passage.

Generally speaking, these questions follow the chronology of the passage, but they are all worth the same amount of points. Thanks for the tip from Fred B. When dealing with questions asking about things in context, the best approach is to return to the beginning of the sentence or the previous sentence and read the end of that sentence to understand its meaning. It may also be a good idea to read the sentence that follows as well.

A great way to pace yourself is to take the number of multiple choice questions and to divide the number by two. Therefore, if you have 60 questions to answer and an hour to do so, you should be at question 30 by the 30 minute mark. You can also use this approach by dividing by the number of passages. Create your own excitement about the prompt and what you have to say about it.

If you can find a way to be passionate about it, you will write faster, easier, and better. She scored a 4.

AP English Language Course Study Tips

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AP English Language and Composition Course Description— This is the core document for this course. It clearly lays out the course content and describes the exam and AP Program in general.

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Be Specific: When writing your essays for the AP Language and Composition exam, be specific. The prompt may ask you to discuss the rhetoric devices used in a passage. The prompt may ask you to discuss the rhetoric devices used in a passage. AP English Language and Composition is a course in the study of rhetoric ap language and composition essay help taken in high school. Cracking the AP English Language & Composition Exam, Edition: Explore timing and format for the AP English Language and Composition Exam, and review sample questions, scoring guidelines, and sample .

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Unlike on some other exams, where the content is the most important aspect of the essay, on the AP Language Exam, organization, a well-developed argument, and strong evidence are all critical to strong essay scores. In gist, AP Language and Composition is an extremely rigorous course that requires you to write essays that demonstrate primal ability to analyze works of literature. Perfect grammar and structure on an exam like this will not award you maximum points or a .